Château de Lacquy

Producing Armagnac since 1711

Château de Lacquy is the oldest family-run maker of Armagnac.

In the early 1700’s, the expanding aristocracy and the growth of a wealthy bourgeoisie in the United Kingdom and in Scandinavia created a strong demand for eaux-de-vie. The development of seafaring trade, both merchant ships and the Navy also helped fuel the growth in demand for Armagnac and cognac. Makers of Armagnac and cognac were compelled to organise.

This is the historical context in which the purchase of Château de Lacquy took place in 1711, towards the end of the reign of King Louis XIV, for the purpose of making Armagnac. Since 1711, the Château de Lacquy has remained in the hands of the same family. Today, the current owner, Gilles de Boisséson, is the tenth generation at the helm of Château Lacquy.

The Château archives attest that the estate was a major producer of Armagnac in the 18th century. Historical documents show that the Armagnac was produced exclusively from the Piquepoult (Folle Blanche) wines made at the estate, distilled on site with the traditional still, and transported – up until the early 1900’s – by a team of oxen to the city of Mont-de-Marsan. From Mont-de-Marsan the Armagnac travelled by boat to Bayonne, from where it was shipped abroad.